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20130807
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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
and thunderstorms east of the mississippi. and the heaviest, from new york down to the carolinas. >> upper 70s from boston to new york. 80s in the midwest. 90s in the southeast. triple digits for dallas and phoenix. >>> innovative fast food. wait until you see the breakfast treat taco bell is rolling out in more areas. >> it's a good one. >>> plus, a hot air balloon plummets to the ground with an american family onboard. and the prominent california man killed in the crash. >>> a heart scare for george w. bush. the former president waking up in a hospital. why doctors decided to operate >>> checking out to be another nervous day on wall street, as stocks open lower for the second-straight day. the dow lost 93 points on fears that the federal reserve could begin pulling back on its massive infusion of cash that's been so popular with traders. >>> the feds are going after bank of america as the government tries to clean up the behavior that led to the great recession. the justice department is suing b of a for allegedly lying to investors about the risks of the toxic loans that led to the housing col
picky about where it breeds. >> all 100 of those frogs are here, in mississippi. >> it was only one breeding pond known to exist, which was in harrison county, mississippi, and it had not been seen in louisiana since 1967. people kind of laughed, that frog is way over in mississippi, they've seen him, how did he swim across three rivers, cross three interstates and end up over here. >> the designated land in louisiana is privately owned and has been in one family for generations. >> it's land that my family has owned for well over 100 jeers, it's an actively managed tree farm. my great grandfather started a lumber company after the civil war. he built a lumber railroad in these areas in order to bring the timber down. we are standing right now in the middle of an area of about 1500 acres the fish and wildlife service has certified is a critical habitat for frogs that have not been here for many, many years, the frogs need certain elements to live. one of them is a pond. the fish and wildlife service says this is one of these ponds. now it renders his land worthless to potential deve
on the a dark rainy morning as he found himself biking to his miserable job in mississippi he felt real despair. from recognized he was 47 years old and never had a car and afford for 20 years in prison. sometimes he says it's little things like that that can drag him down into sorrow. he chose to do something that both keep those wasted years fresh in his memory. he helps to educate others in the hopes that his story will spur reform. he's not an educated man. his formal schooling stopped in 6th grade. the katrina criminal justice reform effort. that's the holistic reentry program for offenders. he told anybody with time to spare and inclination to listen. putting a face on an abstract idea, injustice. on this particular afternoon in may 2012, he tells this story to me for a fourth time. he is deeply preoccupied with a judge who denied his case for years. who also heard his murder case in 1976. the month he was released the judge died. greg goes to his house to get his tattered obituary he's read many times. the obituary says nice things. the judge may have been a goodman, greg muses, he might
in this effort. >> host: republican line, brookhaven, mississippi. >> caller: yeah, this is mary. i don't like what y'all are doing on this. you are showing security staff, showing security staff. you are showing pictures and everything. expected tell them how to get badges and all kinds of things. i don't think john should be doing this. i wish you would please, please telling this on tv. terrorist watch tv. i'm highly upset. >> host: abcaeight. all right. >> guest: maybe i can give you a little bit of comfort. where i have done today is the 30,000-foot level. much, much more detail that goes into it than what i can't even describe today. rest assured that there is a great deal of security in and around the port and ports around the country. the federal government is doing a good job. it does need funding to continue that effort. >> host: of the information you told us i assume is public information. >> guest: it is. >> host: the role of the coast guard and security. at what point did they come into play? and then once the ship is here, who takes over security at that point? >> guest: securit
the mississippi. >> sort of. >> rose: to memphis, or somewhere. >> well, i can't explain it. this is just music that touched me from the very first moment i heard it. i was very, very young, and i believe it was a willy dixon record, but i'm not sure. but i heard this sound, this sort of wonderful sliver of light broke through between a minor third and a major third-- and i later investigated what that actually means. i didn't even know it at the time. and i just-- it made me shiver. it was almost like an electric shock. and i realized this is where i wanted to live. i wanted to be in that space and hear these sounds and these stories knowing, of course, that i'm monumentally unsuited for the task. you know, i'm not from here. this is not my music. >> rose: before we talk about "house," where did you grow up? >> i grew up in ox horde, england, home of the blues-- it's not the home of the blues. ( laughs (. >> rose: maybe oxford, mississippi. >> yes, i grew up in oxford. >> rose: your dad was-- >> he was a doctor. >> rose: your moment? >> she was-- she raised four children. >> rose: of which you
continues in the south with temperatures near or above 100 degrees from texas to mississippi. and the atlantic coast will see its share of wet weather. >>> in sports, the los angeles angels just can't seem to solve the texas rangers. in the first inning the angels tie the game at 2-2 on back-to-back homers, but in the eighth, rangers' third baseman adrian beltre slaps an rbi single to right field to break a 3-3 tie. texas adds four runs in the ninth for an 8-3 win. >>> and some gnatty finance between nl east rivals washington and atlanta. bryce harper gives the nationals a 1-0 lead when he homers to center field. the next time bryce harper comes to the plate, he's hit by a pitch and tempers flair as he heads toward first base. while the benches were cleared, no punches were thrown, no one was ejected. the braves win, 2-1, their 12th straight victory. >>> and, finally, it's hard enough to bowl a perfect game, but the way one bowler lost his bid for a 300 was heartbreaking. >> looking for perfection, 300. come on, ball. oh, my god. >> oh, no. >> holy cow. did you see that? >> o
in the united states, and not alabama or mississippi. we're talking about new york city, madison avenue. >> have you experienced it in new york? >> not as much because new york is sort of my city, and i tend to go places where i'm expected. i think in someways, i've started to do that because i don't want to have these kinds of experiences. >> so you're almost avoiding it? >> exactly. i have been, you know, passed up by a taxi driver. i've also had a taxi driver yell something foul at me -- >> both of us. >> i have been. i might be more -- >> just because i'm annoying. >> where as i've had some foul "n" word yelled at me on a new york city street. >> have you really? >> absolutely in the middle of the street. >> they aren't talking to me. it's not what they call you, it's what you answer to. i know what i am and i won't allow anybody to put me in a box. >> has it gotten better since the first black president of the united states or not? >> yeah, it's not so much that it's gotten better. i think it's become more of a conversation, and, you know, the race conversation is one that black america has
are graduates from syracuse which are fifth and shepherd smith went to you have the of mississippi which was 14th and hemmer went to university of ohio which was 16th. do you know what this means? >> no. >> todd kelly is stocking all of them. >> true. that is an interesting and completely pointless list. >> greg, your senior year was a blur, right? >> my four years was a blur. >> what senior year? >> i actually cleaned up. my first two years were nothing but drinking and bad grades. and then i realized if i wanted a job i had to become -- i cleaned it up. boy that was a boring story. i expected something funny to come out of my mouth and instead it was just a little spit. coming up, ralph maccio is dead -- set against making a karate 4. he probably can't lift his leg past this point. i kid. what is this? a 15-ton ball of fat? i think i have died and gone to 15 ton ball of fat heaven. >>> was it a proper greeting for a player's cheating? on monday alex rodriguez made his season debut shortly after mlb suspended him for using performance enhancing drugs. and he wasn't met with cheers as i had pre
like mississippi, alabama, tennessee, will for every dollar that their citizens put into the federal coffers, those states w we have $1.20, $1.40 back on their investments. states in the north get 91 cents back on every dollar their citizens pay. new yorkers get in the line of 68 cents to 70 cents back. this is to generally sub subside programs like medicare that the south claim they hate but gobble up disproportionately. >> here we find ourselves rolling our eyes at the latest anti abortion bill or anti voting allow. paula deen among georgia republicans has better approval ratings than dr. martin luther king. do we take a poll like this seriously? >> yes. >> what do you think it means? >> specifically for paula deen, she kind of represents this pinnacle of what a lot of contemporary southerners want to feel is the new south, which is somebody who brings all the old school genteel manners and refinement and all this sort of stuff and brings with it a comp temporary viewpoint makes it so that they don't to have apologize for that, you know, slave day flag that they love to wave around
the mississippi, in the middle of no place. a lot of these warehouses are in industrial wasteland areas. people commute from nearby cities from all over. the warehouse i was working in had thousands of people in it. since it was the run-up to christmas, they were hiring 4000 additional temporary workers just for the last four months of the year. from the moment i arrived in town, even before i got to the warehouse, i stopped at the local chamber of commerce, and they told me, do not st crying and do not take what happens to you personally. it is a very ugly scene in their beer there are lots of people who would be willing to take your job because the economy is so bad, so basically put up with what ever they throw at you and leave your dignity at the door. that is what i did and that is what everyone else there did. >> could you talked about what prompted you to get this temporary job, had they become interested in conditions in these types of warehouses? >> i had done another story about the death of the middle class in ohio in the run-up to governor kasich's budget cuts that he was doing, so
, kansas, massachusetts, maryland, michigan, minnesota, mississippi, montana, new hampshire, new mexico and washington state. >> good for mississippi. >> bill: how about that. unfortunately, there are still too many kids who are suffering from obesity. one in eight preschoolers in the united states is obese according to the cdc. a third of u.s. children and teens and still more than 2/3 of adults. so you know, we're not out of the woods yet but some good news on that front. president obama talked about this last night with jay leno and he gave some credit where i think credit is due. >> obama: to michelle's credit, the let's move initiative that she's been involved with, that has gotten so many folks all around the country doing stuff to help kids exercise and eat right, for the first time in a long time, we've started to see some modest reduction in childhood obesity. [ applause ] >> bill: very important cause that the first lady has taken on. i think she's done a damn good job of it. and she's had people in the white house. she's done videos. you know what? it's working! we just gotta
nominated me and the campaign was congressman jim mcgovern from mississippi who had been -- he and joe mokely, the late joe had been strong supporters of our work. i knew him personalfully a sense. personally as a congressperson. whenever we were having trouble, they were always there. i have a great affection for him. >> host: back to '97 when the announcement came out. were you anticipating it? >> guest: we knew we were frontrunners. that's the truth. >> host: how did you know? >> guest: we knew we had been nominated. mcgovern wasn't the only one. there was a woman from sweden, i think at the time was the head of their foreign relations committee. she nominated us. i heard later that others had as well. when we were in norway negotiating the treaty which was in september of '97 was the last phase of the negotiation. journalists started coming up to us and saying how do you feel about being a frontrunner. our response is we're not here to discuss the peace prize. >> host: here is a picture there. where is that picture? >> guest: my house in vermont. we received the call. my now husban
and thunderstorms east of the mississippi. and the heaviest from new york down to the carolinas. >> upper 70s from boston to new york. mostly 80s in the midwest. 90s in the southeast. triple digits from dallas to phoenix. >>> all right. we have approximately 425 million reasons why this is our "favorite story of the day." you probably know why by now? >> simply because tonight's powerball jackpot is now up to at least $425 million. it is the fourth largest top prize in the multistate lottery's history. >> no one has won the jackpot since june 22nd. that's why it's high. as always your chances of winning are 175 million:1. good luck to everyone. especially the commish. of course, he obviously wrote this script for us. >> he wrote the script. >> the script. >> good luck to me. ha-ha. >> hey, someone has got to win, commish. right? >> would you come in the next day if you won? >> not a chance. >> not a chance. not a chance. >> he is with me. >> you say no. >> call out sick. lay low. figure out what i'm going to do. >> i will tell you on television. the dangerous things i would do if i were to become
down to alabama and mississippi and tennessee to unionized those work places with the new german model. tracy: they want to have a decision team that sits on the company's board? it sounds crazy. >> also work councils and different groups like that and they say it works in germany but those jobs have moved from tennessee -- from germany to tennessee and their growth rate has them lower than ours even a we have not had a very good growth rate recently as 1.7% tracy: i understand the logic. they come to tennessee purposely because it is right to work not to do with the union nonsense but said the union thinks we can convince them otherwise? >> exactly also the auto companies and the south are adding workers nissan has 5,000 and one to add another 2,000. of they are expanding by at jeep is moving to new china for the export market not even expanding in ohio to one that is crazy but your point that membership has fallen with 11 percent of the work force in the unit is down from 20%. >> and only 6 percent of private-sector workers are in the union right ow. tracy: what is the incentive to
in texas. heat advisories and heat warnings from mississippi up into arkansas, oklahoma, texas. it's not just the air temperature, but the feels like temperature, and it says it will feel like 108, and 107 in shreveport. but you get here in the 70s in new england. 60s in the up of michigan and on into northern minnesota. 90s interior sections of the pacific northwest. the two risk areas for severe weather both in the central plains and also upper midwest and the heat continues on into parts of new mexico. but gorgeous in los angeles today. sunshine, 75. >>> 7:34 on wednesday morning. cloudy start to the day over the go bridge. we have a lot of high and mid levelle clouds, not a lot of fog. updated all morning long. what is going to happen, we'll see the westerly flow, cool ocean air inland. enough of the wind so a fog isn't much of a factor even later tone when it rolls in. 58 degrees in san francisco. 72 in san jose 74 santa teresa. finally seasonal averages monday. >> al, thank you very much. this morning on rossen reports, a new crime targeting women at gas stations. thieves str
martin is the 14-year-old black belt that was assassinated in the middle of mississippi in 1985 for allegedly violating racial etiquette and speaking to a white woman. his body was placed in the tallahassee river with a 125 lb coffin jindal tied around his neck. it was shown in the jet magazine and that spurred the nation to look at the price of white supremacy on our dhaka see. we think about 1963, 1963 is the year of birmingham and the year dr. king writes his famous letter from the jail. dr. king says the activism that has gone on the end of the young women and men in that are being addressed it sometimes as eight, naim, 10-years-old are taking the nation back to the democracy that was dug deep by the founding fathers. he was being too kind because the country was founded on racial slavery and it is a conversation that we still have not had. about 50 years ago with the march on washington provided a litmus test for democracy. when he speaks of the march on washington she says americans of all cultures and races have to struggle together and go to jail together to try to funda
direction. florida, georgia, michigan, mississippi. these are states that have been difficult to target. i think over time you want to see how the numbers do. the concern for some time is these children had about a five-time likelihood of growing up to be obese adults as well. the problem is coming. this is the first time we have seen sustained improvement. >> the states are all over the country. it's not concentrated in one region at all. is there a reason, a cause for h this drop at this point? >> we're not entirely sure. we asked the same question. >> of course. >> i would say this is the kitchen sink mentality. the obesity epidemic, throw everything at the problem to see what sticks. that was good probably. the hard part is trying to figure out what worked. one clue is ta the low income children being affected points to federal subsidy programs as a possible cause, a benefit. wic and food stamp programs have regulated what people can buy to eat. much more healthy buying going on. decrease ing sugary drinks. also breastfeeding. there is a sustained effort. it makes a difference. childre
today in louisiana. i got that. >> it is only mississippi, alabama, three states. >> i said that. >> seriously. i think before -- you have never done that? >> i think the panhandle went all the way to louisiana. he was technically maps. if you look at the maps of your late 18th century map maker. >> i think he is tired. >> there are many other states that embrace those conservative values, the approach that we have taken over the years. i am in one today in florida. you look at south carolina. you look at florida -- >> we're in louisiana. >> i know and i said that. i am in one of those states that reflect those today in louisiana. >> we are here. how great is he? >> i want him to run. >> he just might. >> howard stern. >> i would have been scared to do this interview. >> he was good. judge of "america's got talent" they are across the street at radio city music hall. i asked why he wanted to take the gig. >> i took it because i thought it was fun. i was a viewer of the show. i would judge from my bedroom and would go on the air and say i should be a judge on these shows. i will t
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)